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Why You Should Attend – By Audience

Sep 21 2010 2010 Conference | Comments Off on Why You Should Attend – By Audience

We believe a variety of audiences will benefit from attending the conference.

The TRI Reporting Community may be particularly interested in hearing about:

  • The new features in TRI‐Meweb in Reporting Year 2010;
  • Future TRI rulemakings and TRI enforcement goals;
  • Various ways TRI data can be used for community advocacy, environmental justice, and financial measurement; and
  • Data quality activities implemented by US EPA’s TRI Program, which strive to optimize and enhance the quality of TRI data.

Government Officials may be particularly interested in hearing about:

  • Improving access to information for environmental justice groups, Alaska local governments and Alaska Native Villages, and community organizations;
  • Suggestion for improvements to TRI that would improve public engagement and understanding of toxic release data;
    and
  • The present knowledge base of Alaska local governments and Alaska Native and community organizations of the TRI and environmental indicator programs.

Environmental Justice (EJ) Organizations, Community Groups, and Non profits may be particularly interested in hearing
about:

  • The challenges various EJ groups encountered when using TRI to carry out advocacy efforts;
  • A successful case study in Imperial County, CA which enables residents to report environmental violations in their communities in near real time; and
  • Ways to access and combine information to build community environmental profiles.

The Financial Sector may be particularly interested in hearing about:

  • The advantages and disadvantages in using TRI data for financial means;
  • The usability of TRI data as a risk, opportunity or performance indicator; and
  • Recent improvements to the parent company information in TRI, which improve data usefulness.

Tribes may be particularly interested in hearing about:

  • The approaches, successes and challenges of the Alaska Big Village Network;
  • Potential exposure risks from hazardous wastes to reservation populations;
  • A study examining the potential effects of atrazine and other pesticides on human beings, aquatic life, and fisheating wildlife from the Kickapoo Environmental Office; and
  • A case study examining mercury contamination at Kelly Pond and how the Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska used TRI data and tools to assess the problem.

Academics and Research Institutions may be particularly interested in hearing about:

  • A study that evaluates TRI data with respect to air pollution around public schools;
  • An approach that bridges the different logical elements of community engagement with toxins in the environment into an interactive framework; and
  • A detailed view of the TRI Program based on quantitative analyses of TRI data state by state, along with survey results from a sample of facility representatives and public officials.