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Training Conference 2010: Presenter Biographies

Sep 15 2010 2010 Conference | Comments Off on Training Conference 2010: Presenter Biographies

Troy Abel Professor Troy Abel’s teaching and research interests focus on the dynamic tensions of environmental science and democratic politics in a variety of arenas including community-based environmental protection, environmental justice, and international conservation projects. He holds an appointment with the faculty of Environmental Studies at Western Washington University’s Huxley College of the Environment where he annually teaches environmental policy, environmental regulation, environmental impact assessment, and environmental policy analysis.

Beginning with his dissertation, one strand of Professor Abel’s scholarship has focused on why some communities achieve more environmental protection. This research led to a National Science Foundation grant and publications in the American Behavioral Scientist and Public Works Management and Policy. Some communities also endure higher pollution risks and his work also analyzes these patterns of environmental injustice and how social science frames the problem.

His paper titled "Skewed riskscapes and environmental injustice" appeared in a 2008 issue of Environmental Management. Professor Abel is also co-author with Michael Kraft and Mark Stephan on the forthcoming MIT Press book "Coming Clean: Information Disclosure and Environmental Performance."

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Edith Afugbuom Edith Afugbuom is an Industrial Scientist born in Port Harcourt, Nigeria. She holds a B.Sc and a Post-graduate Diploma in Industrial Chemistry, both qualifications having been obtained from the University of Port Harcourt. Her interest in Environmental Justice stems from her first hand experience of the devastation of the Niger Delta by oil industry activities. She is keen on models for peaceful coexistence between the industry and the people who have to live near it. She spends her time bringing Environmental Education to local schools and communities, and in this way, gathering a massive effort toward protecting, preserving and restoring the Environment.

She initiates and supervises Environmental Justice festivals through grassroots awareness programmes that target the most vulnerable and worst affected segments of the population, namely Women and Children. In this way, she helps to create the needed awareness for communities to fight against the threat of chemicals from industries that could harm them.

Edith is married with four children.

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Viswateg Attili (Tej) Tej completed his Bachelors in Information Technology in India in 2002, and he completed his Masters and PhD in Watershed Management/Water Resources at the University of Wyoming. Tej is currently working for the Kickapoo Tribe in Kansas as a Water Quality Coordinator, a position he has held since 2009. Currently, he is monitoring and assessing different water bodies (streams, ponds, and groundwater) on the Kickapoo Nation using the EPA’s Clean Water Act Section 106 grant. He loves to travel and work on education and outreach activities.

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Kim Balassiano Kim Balassiano has a B.S. in Foreign Service from Georgetown University and an M.S. in Geography from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She has worked as an Information Management Specialist for EPA since 2007. She has 17 years of geospatial analysis and application development experience supporting the EPA, other federal agencies and academia.

Kim Balassiano is currently employed by EPA as an Information Management Specialist in the Office of Environmental Information (OEI). She is working on several application development projects including OEI’s MyEnvironment, OEJ’s EJView, and OW’s Watershed Central wiki. Her branch is responsible for the development of geospatial and other applications, such as blogs and wikis, in support of the Agency’s public access goals. She is on the Watershed Central Steering Committee, the Search Summit Team, and the Urban Waters Communications Team to the UWI Workgroup.

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Frank Behan Frank Behan has 18 years experience with regulatory programs in EPA’s Office of Resource Conservation and Recovery (formally the Office of Solid Waste), including over 16 years with the hazardous waste combustion regulatory program. He is currently the acting Chief of the Energy Recovery and Waste Disposal Branch, which is the branch that was responsible for developing the June 2010 proposed rule regarding the disposal of coal combustion residuals from electric utilities. Frank graduated from Virginia Tech with a MS degree in civil engineering.

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Sue Briggum Since 1987, Sue has been with the Washington, D.C. office of Waste Management, where she is responsible for regulation and policy involving federal environmental regulation and sustainability.

Before joining Waste Management, Sue was an environmental lawyer with Piper & Marbury and its predecessor, where she co-authored the Hazardous Waste Regulation Handbook: A Practical Guide to RCRA and Superfund. She has served on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s NACEPT Superfund Advisory Committees in 1994 and 2004; National Environmental Justice Advisory Committee as a Council or Work Group member since 1993 (including work groups on hazardous waste facility siting, best practices for waste transfer stations, environmental justice in facility permitting, pollution prevention and environmental justice, cumulative risks and impacts (co-chair), and the integration of environmental justice into EPA programs (co-chair)); Title VI of the Civil Rights Act Advisory Committee; and Compliance Assistance Advisory Committee. She co-chaired both terms of the National Environmental Policy Commission, convened at the request of the Congressional Black Caucus. She was a two-term member of the New York State Environmental Justice Advisory Committee. She was vice-chair of the American Bar Association’s Committee on Environmental Justice, and is on the advisory board for the Harvard Environmental Law Journal.

Sue received her B.A. from the University of Pittsburgh; Ph.D. in English Literature from the University of Wisconsin (where she taught literature and business writing); and J.D. from Harvard University.

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Samuel Bronson Sam Bronson is currently employed in EPA’s Office of Environmental Information (OEI) – Office of Information Analysis and Access (OIAA) – where he works on application and policy development related to public access to government information. In addition to his work on the Lead-Free Kids website, Sam is involved in the research and implementation of mobile technologies at EPA, and is a member of the Envirofacts project team.

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Deborah Brown Ms. Brown is a special assistant to the director of Civil Rights and Urban Affairs presently managing the Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA), the Emergency Planning and Community Right to Know Act (EPCRA), the Clean Air Act 112r (CAA 112r), and tribal and Federal facility programs. She has served in numerous capacities during her 18-year tenure at the United States Environmental Protection Agency’s Region 1 Office. She has managed its Enforcement Office, the Regional Laboratory, and the Region’s Toxics and Pesticides enforcement program. In addition to managing the programs described above, Ms. Brown was Vice President for Brownfields Pilots and Counsel, with the Institute for Responsible Management while on leave from EPA for two years. While there, she also co-authored a book on Brownfields. Ms. Brown has also served as an EPA counsel.

Prior to her EPA employment, Ms. Brown was director of Equal Employment Opportunity for the New York Transit Authority, counsel for the Texas Department of Agriculture, and an assistant to the Governor of Texas. Ms. Brown received her JD from the University of Texas School of Law, and a BA from Creighton University in Omaha, Nebraska.

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Steve Brown R. Steven Brown is the Executive Director. He joined ECOS in September 1996, after having assisted in ECOS’ creation in 1993. He has worked on environmental protection since graduating from the University of Kentucky with an MS in Zoology and an MA in English in 1976. From 1985 to 1996 he was the director of The Council of State Governments’ environmental policy center, where he conducted numerous environmental and technical policy studies on state-federal issues. He worked for Kentucky’s Division of Air and the Division of Permits; later he spent four years with private engineering firms. A native Kentuckian, he is the author of numerous articles, monographs, and books on environment and technology. Some of the things Steve does for ECOS include:

  • Working in concert with the officers and Executive Committee, oversees and manages entire ECOS operation;
  • Organization’s chief staff representative and spokesman on Capitol Hill, to federal agencies, to other state associations and to other organizations;
  • Works with ECOS’ primary committees to inform them of pending legislation and rule-makings, and to develop policy responses to them;
  • Proposes and develops strategies for consideration by leadership;
  • Chief staff liaison with government agencies;

Works directly with ECOS Officers and Executive Committee on planning meetings to discuss policy and make organizational decisions.

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John Byrd John Byrd is Senior Instructor in the Finance and Managing for Sustainability programs at the University of Colorado at Denver’s Business School. He is currently teaching a class (possibly one of only two in the US) on business and climate change. He has published about 30 academic articles, including articles on SO2 trading and a forthcoming article that examines how TRI and RSEI information affects stock prices of reporting companies.

Prior to earning his PhD in financial economics from the University of Oregon, he received an MPPM degree in public policy analysis from Yale University and a math degree from Fort Lewis College, Durango, Colorado. John and his family spend as much time as they can in the outdoors, especially cross-country skiing, backpacking and hiking.

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Orlando Cabrera-Rivera Orlando Cabrera-Rivera has over twenty years of experience in the environmental management field and in the development and implementation of international, national, regional and local environmental pollution management and policy initiatives. Since 2007, Mr. Cabrera-Rivera has been the Manager of the Air Quality and Pollutant Releases Program of the Commission for Environmental Cooperation (CEC). He coordinates trilateral capacity building and environmental information analysis efforts aimed at enhancing the comparability and accessibility of pollutant release and transfer register (PRTR) data and air quality-related information for North America.

Mr. Cabrera-Rivera has a bachelors of science degree in meteorology from the Department of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and a masters of science degree in land resources management from the Gaylord Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies at UW-Madison.

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Louise Camalier Louise Camalier is a recent transfer to OEI as of a few months ago. She comes from the Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards, where she spent six years providing statistical support to the Air Quality Assessment Division. Her general area of expertise includes the analysis of criteria pollutants for NAAQS reviews, uncertainty assessments in ambient air instruments, comparative analyses of monitoring networks, as well as personal research to further the understanding between ozone and specific meteorological variables.

Louise spent much of this past summer staffing EPA’s Emergency Operations Center during the BP oil spill crisis. Recently, she was selected to receive a Science and Technological Achievement Award (STAA) for her Atmospheric Environment article, The effects of meteorology on ozone in urban areas and their use in assessing ozone trends, which included the development of a regression model to adjust ozone concentrations for inter-annual variations in meteorology. This model is currently used to assess the effectiveness of control programs on decreasing emissions.

This fall, Louise is leading an OEI rule to enhance Tribal participation in the TRI program. She continues to support the Office of Air, as she conducts the analysis to determine the new state-based ozone monitoring seasons as part of the Ozone Monitoring Rule. Louise spent her undergraduate years at North Carolina State University, where she graduated Summa cum Laude with a BS in Statistics. She earned her Master’s degree at Johns Hopkins University in Public Policy, with a concentration in Environmental Policy.

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Douglas Chatham Doug Chatham received the B.S. Chem degree from the University of Georgia and the M.S. Chem degree from Georgia Inst. Of Tech. He has worked as a nuclear chemist, a process chemist and troubleshooter, and an environmental chemist.

As an environmental chemist, he worked as a project manager with a Superfund contractor, Senior chemist for an environmental engineering firm, and Environmental Specialist for the Air Monitoring group with the State of Georgia. He also worked as the air contact for the Army Reserves and conducted Environmental Baseline Surveys for the Marines and Navy in support of an effort to privatize base utilities. He is currently working with Region 4 EPA in the TRI program as a SEE enrollee.

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Charlie Chase A conservation and restoration ecologist with 30 years experience around the world, Charlie Chase has a Masters in Biology from the University of Colorado and conducted doctoral work at Florida State University in Evolutionary Ecology. Charlie’s interest in adaptations to extreme environments evolved into efforts to conserve many of these endangered habitats and associated species, throughout the Western Hemisphere. Education and community outreach have been key elements of his work throughout. Charlie started his science career as a curator at the Denver Museum of Natural History and non-game biologist for the Colorado Division of Wildlife. For the last 15 years, he has worked as an environmental ecologist, conducting studies on pesticides, groundwater registration studies, hazardous waste assessment and cleanup, and environmental remediation and restoration. He has worked extensively with counties and small cities on a variety of environmental programs, grants and public education initiatives.

Charlie is a senior instructor in the Landscape Architecture Department, College of Architecture and Planning, University of Colorado Denver teaching Ecology and Design, Landscape Ecology, and Environmental Planning. As part of his effort at UCD he is working with the LA New Orleans Initiative. He is continuing his work with the Community Action for a Renewed Environment (CARE) program, a new EPA initiative designed to establish a series of multi-media, community-based and community-driven projects to reduce local exposure to toxic pollution. He works with AmeriCorps and other youth and community groups developing projects for community environmental change. He is piloting several PhotoVoice projects in Denver as part of developing further tools for community action. Furthermore, he works with FrontRange Earth Force to support teachers in student community projects with environmental science and GIS.

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John Chelen John C. Chelen, President of Hampshire Research, is an attorney and systems engineer with substantial experience with environmental, energy, and health issues. He holds degrees from Carnegie-Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh School of Law and has studied graduate economics at Georgetown University. He has been funded by EPA and other federal agencies, the World Bank, and numerous foundations, to work on environmental and information research and development initiatives. Most recently he has been involved with a high-tech transportation start-up.

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Thelma Codina Ms. Codina is a chemical engineer by discipline and is currently the Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) Program Manager of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) Region 5. Prior to joining the U.S. EPA, Ms. Codina had been a faculty member of a chemical engineering department at the university level and was a process engineer in a multinational engineering and consulting firm. She passed the Professional Engineer licensure examination for the state of Illinois.

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Barbara Conklin Barbara Conklin earned her degree from the University of Colorado in Environmental Conservation. Early in her career she worked with the U.S. Geological Survey evaluating and regulating the environmental impacts of oil and gas and mining exploration and production operations. She spent over 15 years in the Underground Injection Control Program at EPA where she wrote regulations, oversaw state implementation of the program and inspected and enforced program requirements. Throughout her career she has worked closely with Tribes and she worked for several years in the Tribal Assistance Program in EPA Region 8. She has also worked in the Wetlands Enforcement Program in EPA Region 8 and she is currently the TRI Program Coordinator for the Region.

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Bill Davenhall Bill Davenhall has served as the Health and Human Services Solutions Manager at ESRI, the world’s largest GIS software developer, since 1997. Bill’s experience in health and human services spans nearly four decades and includes executive leadership of hospitals, health and social service research organizations, and healthcare data companies. Bill is a frequent author and international speaker on the subject of the application and use of geographical information for solving complex human health challenges and improving health. Bill holds a Masters Degree (with a concentration in Medical Behavioral Science) from the University of Kentucky and was awarded an NIMH Traineeship in conjunction with his work at the University of Kentucky Medical Center. Bill has also served on various governmental and non-governmental boards in higher education, national research councils, and health related trade associations.

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Susan Day Susan Day (Abt Associates Inc.) has supported the TRI program since 1989, providing regulatory and economic support for almost every TRI rulemaking since the inception of the program. She has extensive institutional knowledge of the TRI program and has contributed to TRI analyses profiling industries and chemicals for potential addition to the TRI program, addressing data quality and providing context for the data. Ms. Day holds a bachelor’s degree in economics and a master’s degree in resource economics.

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Steve DeVito Steve DeVito has worked in the TRI Program since joining EPA in 1989. Steve provides scientific and other technical support to the TRI Program, and has been directly involved in most of the TRI Program’s major rulemaking activities. Steve is currently the Chairperson of EPA’s Office of Information Access and Analysis’ TRI Data Analysis Team: a multidisciplinary team that provides expert technical, analytical, and consultative support regarding TRI data, its use, and information derived from it, to EPA programs and other governmental organizations, as well as non-governmental organizations and the public. He is a member of the North American Commission of Environmental Cooperation’s Pollutant Release and Transfer Registry Working Group, where he represents EPA’s TRI Program. He is also actively involved in leading efforts that are aimed at advancing and improving the services the TRI Program provides to its customers, and improving the quality of TRI data. Steve was born and raised on Long Island, New York, is married and has two children. He holds a Ph.D. degree and M.S. degree in Medicinal Chemistry, and a B.S. degree in Pharmacy (St. John’s University, New York City), and is licensed to practice pharmacy in New York and Virginia. He is the recipient of many EPA awards and honors, has written two books, and has published many scientific articles and book chapters. Steve has an active interest in U.S. military history. In his spare time, Steve likes to look for Civil War artifacts near his home in Virginia.

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Teresa DeVoe Teri DeVoe has an M.A. in art history and an M.S.L.S. from the School of Information and Library Science at UNC-Chapel Hill. Teri worked in the reference and interlibrary loan departments of the EPA-RTP Library before moving to Headquarters as the contract EPA Library Network Coordinator. As an ASRC Management Service contractor, she supports the National Program Manager, provides communication and outreach support for the entire Library Network, and serves as a "librarians’ librarian" to her colleagues at EPA.

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Jane Dixon Jane Dixon, Ph.D., is an experienced investigator, who has taught research method and conducted research at Yale University School of Nursing since 1975. Her research has focused on behavioral factors in promotion of health, self-management of illness, and, most recently, environmental health. Dr. Dixon’s current interest in environment health focuses especially on engagement of people in promoting healthy environment – i.e., people’s concerns about environmental hazards which may affect health, and the responses to those hazards by those who are most affected. She recently developed an instrument to measure people’s engagement in environmental health. A foundation for this work has been the formulation of an integrated model that identifies four domains of knowledge for environmental health. This integrated model is intended to unify biological and behavioral factors in environmental health research. Using this model, she has recently completed a study about community responses to particulate matter air pollution in New Haven. Dr. Dixon has also authored or co-authored several articles focused on a specific environmental health issue for publication in journals widely read by clinicians.

As a professor, Dr. Dixon primarily teaches courses in research methods, measurement, and evaluation to graduate students in nursing, and she mentors PhD students in research methods. Dr. Dixon was honored to be selected by students to receive the Annie Goodrich Award for Excellence in Teaching at Yale University School of Nursing, in 2006. She has also participated in and led Institutional Review Boards for protection of human subjects in research for many years.

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John Dixon John Dixon, Ph.D., is an educational psychologist, specializing in the psychology of creativity and integrative intelligence. He has been Director of Research at the Hamden-New Haven Cooperative Educational Center and the Center for Theatre Techniques in Education. After joining the Sierra Club, serving on the Executive Committee of the Connecticut Sierra Club, and initiating the formation of the New Haven Environmental Justice Network, Dr. Dixon served on the Board of Directors of the Connecticut Coalition for Environmental Justice. As a part of this effort, Dr. Dixon has been collaborating with his wife Jane on integrating social science research approaches with concerns about the physiological effects of environmental toxics. This has lead to the development of the Integrative Model For Environmental Health Research, which was then used to guide studies for exploring environmental justice issues. Subsequent survey research for understanding patterns in people’s environmental concerns, assumptions and actions has helped refine understanding of the dynamics in the Model.

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Lily Donge As Senior Sustainability Analyst and Manager, Environment, Climate Change and Water, Lily Donge leads the company’s efforts and initiatives related to environment and energy. She oversees Calvert’s environment, climate change and water team and has covered the extractive industries as well as the utility sector. She managed sustainable research processes for investment products, such as the Calvert Social Index(r), the Calvert Global Alternative Energy Fund and most recently the Calvert Global Water Fund. She has testified before the Maryland House of Delegates to lend an investor voice to support clean energy. As part of the research team at Calvert, she engages in outreach and partnerships with public and private organizations on energy issues regarding sustainable development. In 2006, she was part of the consortium that worked with the Global Reporting Initiative to establish disclosure guidelines specific to utilities. Ms. Donge serves as a Board member of the Roberts Environmental Center at Claremont McKenna College. Prior to joining Calvert in 2001, she worked in the Institutions and Governance Program at the World Resources Institute and in investment services at Donaldson, Lufkin, & Jenrette. From Yale University, she earned an MBA from the School of Management and an MA in International Development Economics, and she has a BA in Economics and International Relations from Claremont McKenna College.

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Mark Dorfman Mark Dorfman, Green Chemistry Naturalist, received his Master’s degree in environmental chemistry from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s School of Public Health. His case-study research of waste reduction practices at chemical manufacturing facilities helped INFORM, Inc. spur the creation and passage of the Federal Pollution Prevention Act of 1990 as well as similar laws in key industrial states. He’s had the great privilege of providing technical assistance to disadvantaged communities located along the so-called "chemical corridor" between New Orleans and Baton Rouge, Louisiana in their efforts to promote industrial pollution prevention locally.

On the international front, Mark has worked with chemical industry trade organizations to promote green chemistry in Mexico, India, Russia, and Nepal. In recent years, he¹s created educational materials that link green chemistry with biomimicry including a section in John Wiley and Son¹s Transforming a Sustainability Strategy into Action, a fellowship with the Chemical Heritage Foundation, and leading workshops for scientists and college students in Kathmandu, Nepal through a grant from the American Chemical Society’s Green Chemistry Institute.

In 2007, he joined the Biomimicry Guild to focus full time as liaison between the Guild and the world’s leading green chemists to develop the biomimetic component of green chemistry strategies. He’s charged with the exciting and rewarding task of helping Guild clients find sustainable solutions through inspiration from nature’s warehouse of sophisticated, elegant, and life-friendly chemical transformations.

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John Duffy John Duffy has worked in local and state government for over 30 years; most recently serving as Borough Manager of the Matanuska-Susitna Borough for approximately 10 years. Prior to his appointment as Borough Manager, Mr. Duffy served as Assistant Borough Manager and as the Borough’s Planning Director. Mr. Duffy holds memberships and professional certificates from the International City and County Management Association where he is a credentialed manager, American Institute of Certified Planners, the Society of Human Resource Professionals and Public Performance Measurement from Rutgers University. Mr. Duffy served for several years as a member U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Local Government Advisory Committee where he chaired both the Military and Climate Change/Indicators Workgroups. He also served on EPA’s Government Advisory Committee which addresses NAFTA’s environmental matters. Mr. Duffy also represented local government interests on the state of Alaska’s Military Force Advocacy and Structure Team Advisory Committee and Climate Change Transportation Work Group. He has worked directly on FUDS and UXO projects within the Matanuska-Susitna Borough as well as addressing these matters within the state of Alaska and national arenas. Mr. Duffy holds a Master’s Degree in Urban Planning and Policy from the University of Illinois at Chicago with a specialization in transportation planning. He is currently completing his doctorate at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks examining the attributes associated with local government innovation and sustainability. John received the D. Grant Mickle Award from the National Research Council, Transportation Research Board for the paper Management of Transit Pre-Run Inspections, the Alaska Center of the Environment’s award for Outstanding Commitment to Conservation and Community Planning, and is an Honorary Commander (Emeritus Standing) with the 3rd Wing, U.S. Air Force. Mr. Duffy served with the U.S. Army, Infantry.

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Tony Dutzik Tony Dutzik is senior policy analyst with Frontier Group, a non-profit organization that conducts research and policy analysis to support a cleaner, healthier and more democratic society. Mr. Dutzik is the author or co-author of numerous reports on environmental and public policy topics, including the 2009 report Wasting Our Waterways (co-authored with Environment America Research & Policy Center), which used Toxics Release Inventory data to call the attention of the public and decision-makers to the release of toxic substances to local waterways across the United States. Prior to joining Frontier Group in 2001, Mr. Dutzik worked as a daily newspaper reporter covering education issues for the Lawrence, Mass. Eagle-Tribune, and as an environmental organizer and writer. He holds a bachelor’s degree in public service from Penn State University and a Master’s degree in print journalism from Boston University. He lives and works in Boston.

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Joseph Foti Joseph Foti is a Senior Associate with the Institutions and Governance Program at World Resources Institute. He was the lead author of Voice and Choice: Opening the Door to Environmental Democracy, the second global report of The Access Initiative (TAI), and A Seat at the Table: Including the Poor in Decisions for Environment. He is currently leading work on WRI’s toolkit for civil society engagement in climate change adaptation the Adaptation: Rapid Institutional Analysis (ARIA), is the regional officer for Latin America, and is spearheading work on access to information for environmental justice in the United States. He holds a B.A. from Antioch College and an M.A. in International Development Studies from The George Washington University.

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Lisa Garcia Lisa F. Garcia joined the U.S. EPA in January serving as Senior Advisor to the Administrator for Environmental Justice. In this role Lisa will help elevate EJ issues to the highest levels of the agency and work across programs to integrate and strengthen all of EPA’s EJ initiatives. Lisa’s work will promote meaningful, working relationships with EJ communities, as well as build strong partnerships to address some of the country’s most persistent environmental challenges.

Lisa joins EPA after serving as the Chief Advocate for Environmental Justice and Equity at the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. In that position she developed statewide environmental justice initiatives to tackle critical environmental challenges, and served as co-chair of the Governor’s Environmental Justice Interagency Task Force. Lisa also served as Assistant Attorney General for the New York State Attorney General, where she represented various state agencies in environmental litigation matters and defended New York’s Brownfields Cleanup Program. Lisa also served as Senior Attorney at the New York Public Interest Research Group. Lisa has a long and impressive history using her legal, policy and legislative experience to promote environmental justice.

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Robin Gonzalez Robin L. Gonzalez has been with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for 22 years, supporting the mission of the Agency through his work with environmental systems nationally and internationally. Robin is currently Acting Director of the Office of Information Access and Analysis in Washington, D.C. with responsibility for managing EPA’s website infrastructure, library networks, environmental analysis, the Toxic Release Inventory Program, section 508 and more. Previously, he served as Regional Information Technology Chief in Seattle, Washington, EPA’s Region 10 Office. Robin lives in Carrboro, NC with his wife Robin Rae. They have three children, Nathan, Matthew, and Rebekah.

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Eileen Guana Eileen Gauna is a law professor at the University of New Mexico School of Law, where she teaches environmental law, environmental justice, climate change and the law, energy law, administrative law, and property. Her publications include RECHTSHAFFEN , GAUNA & O’NEILL, ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE: LAW, POLICY AND REGULATION (2nd Ed. 2009), a leading casebook on environmental justice, along with numerous reports, chapters and law review articles on environmental law and environmental justice. Professor Gauna is also a member of the American Law Institute, serves on two environmental justice committees for the American Bar Association and is a member scholar of the Center for Progressive Reform. She has served several tenures on the National Environmental Justice Advisory Council (most recently as co-chair of the screening approaches workgroup), as well as the NACEPT’s Title VI Committee and a Clean Air Act subcommittee. More locally she serves on the Executive Board of the State Bar Section of Natural Resources, Energy and the Environment, the New Mexico Compilation Commission and is a member of a community-based workgroup on Environmental Justice. She has also served as a consultant to the New Mexico Environment Department on its environmental justice initiative. Professor Gauna has spoken at numerous workshops, conferences and symposia on environmental law and environmental justice.

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Steve Hellem Steve Hellem is the Executive Director of the Global Environmental Management Initiative (GEMI) (www.gemi.org) . He has served as the Executive Director since 1998. Steve is the President of Navista, Inc., The Public Affairs Group a Washington, DC-based public affairs firm specializing in coalition and association management, regulatory and legislative advocacy, corporate representation and strategic counseling. Navista provides strategic counsel, leadership and management to GEMI.

Steve has more than 30 years of experience providing strategic counsel and leadership to business associations and coalitions in the areas of environment, technology, energy and sustainability. He has helped create and managed a wide range of business coalitions and associations from multiple business sectors.

One of his areas of expertise is working with companies to address global and domestic environmental, health and safety practices and activities as well as corporate sustainability programs. He maintains close working relationships with senior EH&S and corporate sustainability professionals from a wide range of Fortune 100 companies. In addition to his work with GEMI, his firm also provides strategic management services to the Suppliers Partnership for the Environment, (SP) (www.supplierspartnership.org) and the Corporate Environmental Enforcement Council (CEEC) (www.ceecinc.org). He is also the Director of Sustainability Solutions Providers (SSP) (www.navista.net).

Steve has an BA in Political Science from the University of Missouri and a J.D. from the International School of Law that is today the George Mason University School of Law.

Wendy Henry Wendy Henry has more than 20 years of experience in management and technology consulting. She began her tenure with Johnston McLamb in 1996 as a senior consultant. She was promoted to vice president for consulting operations, and later vice president and chief operating officer. Since being charged with managing all of Johnston McLamb’s operations, she has been pivotal in leading the company’s expansion from a small IT consulting firm to a highly-regarded $30 million company. Wendy has day-to-day responsibility for administrative and consulting operations. She sets the overall direction for consulting and identifies new lines of business. Additionally, she is responsible for ensuring that Johnston McLamb’s services meet the needs of each client.

In addition to consistent year-over-year growth, milestones of Wendy’s leadership have included positioning the company for increased opportunities with the federal sector. She has played a crucial role in Johnston McLamb’s rise to the status of innovator in geospatial and visual business intelligence solutions. Wendy has led the way in establishing influential partnerships with Oracle and NAVTEQ and introducing the firm’s first product, VBIMaps™, a visual business intelligence mapping application. Building Johnston McLamb’s executive management team and reorganizing employee incentives are other key contributions.

During her career, she has served the federal and private sectors, and worked in a university environment. Before joining Johnston McLamb, Wendy was a systems analyst, and later technology services manager for Government Systems, Inc. (GSI). She was responsible for managing the design, development, and implementation of a large, object-oriented network management system. Prior to that, she worked as a systems analyst at Georgetown University, supervising a team of programmers and analysts, and serving as project leader on several major initiatives.

Wendy is a member of the Industry Advisory Council, Women in Technology, Women Executives for Government Excellence and the Council for Excellence in Government. She has received numerous awards, including the Award of Excellence while employed at Georgetown University and was selected to Infonet’s (GSI) President’s Club for outstanding achievement. She holds a B.A. in Economics from the College of William & Mary and an M.S. in Information Systems from George Mason University.

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Ganlin Huang Ganlin Huang is a postdoctoral scholar and the mapping lab coordinator of the Center for Regional Change. She received her Ph.D. in Natural Resources from University of Vermont. Her research focuses on community participation, resource management and environmental justice. She uses both qualitative (case study) and quantitative (statistics, GIS, and spatial analysis) research methods.

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Michael Jacoby As a private citizen, Michael Jacoby will be proposing what he believes to be workable solutions to a problem as it pertains to Facility Registry System (FRS) site coordinate data collection and verification.

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Amanda Jeeter Amanda Jeter recently received her Master’s of Landscape Architecture degree at the University of Colorado Denver. She has been developing TRI curriculum for students at a 6th grade reading level since 2008. The Landscape Architecture Foundation named Ms. Jeter as a National Olmsted Scholar Finalist in 2010 for her work with TRI, with the National Park Service and as founder and editor of ROOT landscape architecture magazine.

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Lisa Jenkins Lisa Jenkins has been working at EPA since 1991, mostly on the staff of the Information Management Official (IMO) for the Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response (OSWER). Currently, in addition to managing Cleanups in My Community (CIMC) and OSWER’s Performance Assessment Tool (PAT), she leads OSWER’s enterprise architecture efforts, Internet and Intranet infrastructure, and geospatial coordination. Lisa has degrees from Harvard and The Kellogg School and has also completed both the CIO and E-Gov certification programs at the IRM College at NDU. Prior to EPA, she provided sales, marketing, consulting and project management services in the private sector.

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Denise Jensen Ms. Denise Jensen has served as Water Quality Specialist for the Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska for nine years. Her accomplishments include the preparation of the tribe’s Quality Assurance Project Plan for the Chemical Assessment of Surface Water, Fish Tissue and Sediments; the Quality Assurance Project Plan for the Physical and Biological Assessment of Surface Water; and the Quality Assurance Project Plan for Ground Water/Domestic Drinking Water Well Assessment. Ms. Jensen has established an extensive surface water monitoring program, generating physical, chemical and biological data; conducted fish tissue collection from several recreational fishing bodies and monitored individual domestic drinking water wells on the Winnebago Reservation. She was enlisted in the Army Reserves for 12 years and served in Desert Storm. Ms. Jensen has an associate degree in medical laboratory technology and a B S .in biology.

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Carey A. Johnston, P.E. Carey Johnston has fifteen years experience with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in the fields of wastewater pollution control, pollutant exposure pathways, site remediation technologies, pollution prevention, and hazardous waste management. Currently he is working on the NPDES Electronic Reporting Rule, which change the current paper-based reporting system to an electronic system that will enable states and EPA to better target the most serious water quality problems. Mr. Johnston works in the U.S. EPA, Office of Water and is currently on detail to EPA’s Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance. Mr. Johnston has a B.S degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Virginia and a M.S. degree in environmental engineering from the Virginia Polytechnic Institute. Mr. Johnston is also a licensed Professional Engineer in the Commonwealth of Virginia.

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Alex Klaessig Alex Klaessig is an analyst with Abt Associates. He has worked with EPA on parent company information for the past several years. Before that, he worked on EPA’s Facility Registry System and the geospatial line of business. Alex studied public policy at Washington, D.C.’s American University.

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Rosemarie Kelley Rosemarie Kelley is director of the Waste and Chemical Enforcement Division (WCED) in the Office of Civil Enforcement which is in the Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Her division has responsibility for managing the Agency’s enforcement of the following regulatory programs:

  • Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA),
  • Toxics Substances Control Act (TSCA),
  • Residential Lead-Based Paint Hazard Reduction Act,
  • Resource Conservation and Recovery Act,
  • Emergency Planning and Community Right to Know Act (EPCRA),
  • Clean Air Act Section 112(r), and
  • CERCLA 103.

WCED also has responsibility for implementing the Agency’s national enforcement priorities for financial responsibility and mineral processing.

Ms. Kelley has served in a number of positions in her 18 years with the Agency. She began as a staff attorney working on implementation of the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments. Since then she has served in a variety of positions in enforcement. In addition to her agency experience, Ms. Kelley also practiced with the environmental group of a Washington, D.C. law firm. She is a graduate of the College of William and Mary and received her law degree from the Washington College of Law at American University.

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Graham Kerster Graham Kerster is a Senior Consultant with Johnston McLamb’s Geospatial Business Intelligence / Visual Business Intelligence Team. He has worked closely with EPAs TRI data sets in developing applications that allow citizens the ability to visually interpret and understand TRIs underlying chemical data. Graham has over 5 years experience in the design, development, and delivery of cost-effective, high-performance technology solutions that meet challenging business demands. He currently specializes in location-based business intelligence applications leveraging spatial technologies to achieve optimal space efficiency of organizations.

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Kara Koehrn Kara Koehrn works in the US EPA’s Office of Environmental Information (OEI) in Washington DC. Before coming to EPA she majored in biology at Davidson College, and earned a Masters in environmental health and toxicology at Duke University. At EPA, Kara is the staff lead for the development of the 2009 Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) National Analysis, which provides EPA’s analysis of TRI data to the public. She is also a member of EPA’s Border 2012 Task Force, which develops and an indicators report and helps manage data for the Border 2012 Program, a joint effort between the US and Mexico to address environmental issues in the border region. Lastly, she is working as a co-lead in the development of a peer review document for an upcoming ICR review within the agency.

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Michael Kraft Michael Kraft is a professor of political science in the Department of Public and Environmental Affairs at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, where he has taught for over thirty years. He is a co-author of the book Coming Clean: Information Disclosure and Environmental Performance, which is to be released by MIT Press in December 2010.

Michael E. Kraft is Professor of Political Science and Public Affairs in the Department of Public and Environmental Affairs and Herbert Fisk Johnson Professor of Environmental Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay. He completed his undergraduate work at the University of California, Riverside, and he received his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Political Science from Yale University. He has taught at UW-Green Bay since 1977 and has held visiting faculty appointments at Oberlin College and the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He teaches courses on environmental politics and policy, public policy analysis, Congress, and environmental science and policy.

Among other works, he is author of Environmental Policy and Politics (5th ed., Pearson Longman 2011 ); co-author of Public Policy: Politics, Analysis, and Alternatives (CQ Press, 3rd edition, 2010); and co-editor and contributing author of Environmental Policy (CQ Press, 7th ed., 2010); Business and Environmental Policy (MIT Press, 2007); Toward Sustainable Communities: Transition and Transformations in Environmental Policy (MIT Press, 2nd ed. 2009); and Public Reactions to Nuclear Waste: Citizens’ Views of Repository Siting (Duke University Press, 1993). He also serves as co-editor (with Sheldon Kamieniecki) of a book series, American and Comparative Environmental Policy, at MIT Press.

His research interests focus on U.S. environmental policy and politics, and his most recent project focuses on the role of information disclosure in improving corporate environmental performance in the United States. It uses the federal Toxics Release Inventory program to examine trends in toxic chemical releases and risk reduction at some 10,000 industrial facilities nationwide and the reasons for variation among firms, communities, and states. This research was funded by the National Science Foundation, and a book on the project, Coming Clean: Information Disclosure and Environmental Performance (co-authored with Mark Stephan and Troy Abel), will be released by MIT Press in December 2010.

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Michael Langlais Michael Langlais currently leads a product development team at RiskMetrics ESG Analytics (part of MSCI Inc., a leading provider of investment decision support tools to investors globally). His team is focused on developing research and systems to facilitate the implementation of sustainability goals for concerned investors. Michael joined the Investor Responsibility Research Center (IRRC), now part of MSCI Inc., in 1999 and over the years has assisted numerous organizations through the process of articulating and applying investment screens and other ESG strategies to ensure that values align with investment decisions. Prior to joining IRRC, Michael worked in the U.S. Senate and monitored labor and employment law issues for a private law firm.

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Sangyun Lee Sangyun Lee is a post-doctoral research fellow in the School of Natural Resources and Environment at the University of Michigan. Dr. Lee has a B.A. degree in Sociology from the University of Washington (1999) and a M.A. degree in Urban and Environmental Planning from the University of Virginia (2001). Dr. Lee has a Ph.D. in Natural Resources and Environment from the University of Michigan (2008). His scholarly interests include environmental justice, sustainable development, environmental planning and policy, and urban inequality.

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Jonathan K. London Jonathan K. London is the Director of the Center for Regional Change and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Human and Community Development. Jonathan conducts research on rural community development and environmental justice. He has extensive leadership experience in non-profit management, participatory research, and community engagement. He holds a Masters of City and Regional Planning and a Ph.D. in Environmental Science, Policy and Management from UC Berkeley.

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Darryl Malek-Wiley Darryl Malek-Wiley is a veteran of the environmental justice movement. He has worked for over 30 years with communities along the Mississippi River to fight toxic pollution and protect peoples’ health. Malek-Wiley joined the Sierra Club Environmental Justice Program in June 2004 to support the efforts of Louisiana environmental justice groups on issues including toxics, pollution and environmental health. He has been dedicated to protecting Louisiana’s environment and people throughout his career. He was a key organizer of the Great Toxics March from Baton Rouge to New Orleans in 1988. This march defined the problem of toxic emissions in the "cancer alley" and launched the campaign for improvement that continues today.

Malek-Wiley has worked for the Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation, Louisiana Environmental Action Network and the Gulf Coast Tenant Organization among others. He has served as the Chair of the New Orleans Group of the Sierra Club, President of the Mississippi River Basin Alliance, and a member of both the Sierra Club’s Ethnic Diversity Task Force and Hazardous Material Committee. He has studied and educated people on toxics, air and water pollution, environmental health, and sociology at the local, state, regional, national and international level. Contact him at darryl.malek-wiley@sierraclub.org.

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Ellen Manges Ellen Manges is a Senior Advisor for EPA’s Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response and is leading OSWER’s Community Engagement Initiative. She has been a policy advisor for OSWER since 2002, working on cleanup program coordination and Superfund issues. Previously she served in EPA Region 9 as a Superfund Remedial Project Manager, specializing in the cleanup of groundwater and mining sites. She started her career as a Hydrogeologist for the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, investigating and enforcing cleanup of groundwater contamination problems. In between her government jobs she worked as a corporate environmental manager, overseeing cleanup at contaminated sites throughout the U.S. Ellen holds a degree in geology from the University of Pittsburgh and studied public management at Carnegie Mellon University.

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Abraham Marquez Abraham Marquez is an Environmental Project Specialist at the National Latino Research Center at California State University – San Marcos. The National Latino Research Center (NLRC) specializes in applied translational research and provides technical assistance to diverse organizations and actively supports multi agency coalitions that seek to develop resources and expertise for community projects. Abraham is an environmental scientist and researcher focusing on environmental justice in Imperial County and is a member of the Imperial County Environmental Justice Task Force, which consists of community based organizations, concerned citizens, and governmental agencies such as Cal EPA’s Department of Toxic Substances Control.

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Ethan McMahon Ethan McMahon is a Senior Analyst in EPA’s Environmental Analysis Division and he has worked with communities and information access for over 15 years. Mr. McMahon managed the development of EPA’s Report on the Environment: Highlights Document, a 40 page report for the interested public. He established the Greenhouse Gas Committee of the Emission Inventory Improvement Program, which harmonized state, national, and international methods for inventorying greenhouse gas emissions. He also developed EPA’s Data Finder, a website for finding EPA’s data sources. Prior to working at EPA, Mr. McMahon was a consultant at Arthur D. Little, where he analyzed greenhouse gas emissions from manufacturing processes and tested flammable refrigerants. Mr. McMahon holds an M.S. degree in Civil and Environmental Engineering from Tufts University.

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Mark Mitchell Dr. Mark Mitchell is the founder and president of the Connecticut Coalition for Environmental Justice, which has local chapters in Hartford, Bridgeport and New Haven. Dr. Mitchell has spent over twenty years working in the public health sector, including as Director of the Hartford Connecticut Health Department and as Deputy Director of the Kansas City, Missouri Health Department. He has spent the past fifteen years educating the community on the effects of the environment on health. Working primarily with communities of color and low-income whites, he teaches people what can be done to prevent and reduce the disproportionately higher rates of disease in their communities.

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Paul Mohai Professor Mohai’s teaching and research interests are focused on environmental justice, public opinion and the environment, and influences on environmental policy making. He is a founder of the Environmental Justice Program at the University of Michigan. His current research includes understanding the causes of disproportionate environmental burdens in people of color communities and the role that environmental factors play in accounting for racial and socioeconomic disparities in health, including children’s health. A Principal Investigator of the 1990 and 2002 Detroit Area Studies (DAS), Professor Mohai is also seeking to understand the root causes of environmental concern and why such concern has become a worldwide phenomenon. He recently co-authored with colleagues Robert D. Bullard, Robin Saha, and Beverly Wright a 20th anniversary update to the historic and influential 1987 report "Toxic Wastes and Race in the United States".

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Rebecca Moser Rebecca Moser is Acting Director of the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) Program Division within EPA’s Office of Environmental Information. She is currently leading a number of efforts to enhance the TRI data and make it more useful and accessible to the public. While at EPA, Rebecca has also served as Associate Director of the TRI Program Division, Chief of TRI’s Regulatory Development Branch, and Manager of the Exchange Network Grant Program.

Rebecca Moser is Acting Director of the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) Program Division within EPA’s Office of Environmental Information. She is currently leading a number of efforts to enhance the TRI data and make it more useful and accessible to the public. During her 17-year Federal career, Rebecca has also served as Associate Director for the TRI Program Division, Chief of TRI’s Regulatory Development Branch, and Manager of the Exchange Network Grant Program. Before coming to EPA, Rebecca worked for the Administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, within the U.S. Department of Commerce, where she was involved in a number of sustainable development and environmental indicator efforts. Rebecca holds a B.S. degree in Biology from Oberlin College and an M.S. degree in Biology, with a focus on Environmental Science and Public Policy, from George Mason University. She also completed the Chief Information Officer (CIO) Certificate Program at National Defense University/Information Resources Management College and the program, "Leadership for a Democratic Society," at the Federal Executive Institute.

(Only difference between this and what’s on the website is this sentence: "Rebecca has experience in strategic planning, budgetary development and execution, team leadership, information sensitivity issues, and guiding the use information technology to meet organizational business needs.")

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Bill Muldrow William (Bill) Muldrow is currently employed at EPA in the Office of Environmental Information (OEI), Office of Analysis and Access (OIAA) – Information Access Division (IAD), and serves as the Envirofacts System Manager and EPA point of contact for the Envirofacts Project team. The Envirofacts website and underlying database warehouse, provides the public with a single point of access to a diverse set of EPA information about environmental activities that may affect air, water, and land anywhere in the United States. Bill Muldrow has worked at EPA since 1981, and has been a member of the Envirofacts project since 1993.

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Talli Nauman Talli Nauman is co-founder and co-director of the bilingual independent media project Journalism to Raise Environmental Awareness, initiated with a MacArthur Fellowship in 1994. She is the Diversity Program Associate and Latin American Initiative Director of the international Society for Environmental Journalists (SEJ), where she leads the association’s efforts to promote collaboration with Spanish language media representatives throughout the hemisphere, prioritizing right-to-know issues that link concerns across geographic and cultural borders.

As an environmental media consultant, her background includes more than 35 years in major media outlets in the Americas, including the Los Angeles Times Syndicate, UPI, and The Associated Press in Los Angeles and Mexico City. She has a master’s degree in International Journalism from the University of Southern California, a bachelor’s degree in Visual and Environmental Studies from Harvard-Radcliffe, and a 2009 diploma in Digital Tools for Sustainable Development Coverage from the Center for Digital Journalism at the University of Guadalajara. Among the books for which Nauman has been a contributing author is Mexico’s Right-to-Know Reforms: Civil Society Perspectives, produced in 2007 by the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. Since 2000, she has been a member of the multi-sector Consultative Committee for North American Pollutant Release and Transfer Registers, under the auspices of the Montreal-based trinational North American Commission for Environmental Cooperation, created by a side-accord to the North American Free Trade Agreement. She attended the advisory committee’s most recent meeting, held in Guadalajara in December 2009, as well as the July 2010 Mexican national stakeholders meeting on pollutant registers.

In 2007, she testified on pollutant registers to the Joint Public Advisory Committee of the NAFTA Commission. In 2006, she was the Western Hemisphere Representative in the negotiations at the United Nations in Geneva for the finalization of the Economic Commission for the Europe’s Pollutant Release and Transfer Register (PRTR) Protocol under the U.N. Aarhus Convention on Access to Information, Public Participation in Decision-making and Access to Justice in Environmental Matters. In 2004, she helped facilitate the first all-American conference on pollutant registers, held in Mexico City under the auspices of the U.N. and the governments of Canada and Mexico. She also explained the trinational pollutant register effort to the first NGO forum on it in Santiago, as Chile began to establish its own register.

In 2007, the Mexican business magazine Expansión named her one of its six |Green Heroes| for her pioneering efforts and dedication to improving environmental journalism in Mexico.

She has provided international environmental media training in the United States (Arizona, California, New Mexico, Texas), Mexico (Aguascalientes, Baja California, Baja California Sur, Distrito Federal, Guerrero, Michoacan, Nayarit, Oaxaca, Quintana Roo, Sinaloa, Sonora, Tamaulipas, Veracruz), Chile, and Panama. Nauman is an environmental analyst for the Mexico City-based Americas Program of the Center for International Policy, in Washington, where she has published numerous articles about pollutant registers.

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Edward Obi Dr. Edward Obi is a Roman Catholic Priest and Director of the Centre for Social and Corporate Responsibility (CSCR), in Port Harcourt, Nigeria. He comes from Nigeria’s Niger Delta region, and his interest in Environmental Justice comes from his first-hand experience of the devastation caused by the oil industry in parts of that region. He completed his initial academic training in Nigeria, worked for fifteen years as a Missionary in Botswana, South Africa, and Nigeria, before taking up research in Social Ethics in the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, in Belgium. His doctoral dissertation defended a notion of participatory ownership of the resources in the region, which could create the context for these resources to be owned inclusively rather than exclusively, and be managed conjointly, by the government, the corporations investing in their exploitation, and the people on whose land they occur. Dr. Obi is interested, therefore, in the reform of social structures, corporate social responsibility and governance. His Centre engages with relevant stakeholders at all levels to bring this about.

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Luis Olmedo Luis Olmedo is the Executive Director of Comite Civico del Valle, an organization located in Imperial Valley, California whose mission focuses on addressing environmental health related problems in the farm worker community. Luis has an established reputation as a leading community activist and advises local, regional, and state programs on environmental health issues affecting Imperial County.

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Andy Opperman Andy Opperman is a Research Scientist with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, Office of Pollution Prevention and Right to Know. Andy’s primary responsibilities include oversight, implementation and technical assistance for the state’s Release and Pollution Prevention Report – a materials accounting approach to the use and fate of toxic and hazardous substances. Andy has been the state TRI contact since October 1988 (a few months after the first TRI Forms R were submitted). Most recently, Andy oversaw the development of the New Jersey TRI Central Data Exchange program which came online May 15, 2007. One of Andy’s charges for many years, internally to DEP as well as externally, has been data quality. To that end, the subject of data quality is a never ending task with an ever-changing regulated universe of facilities.

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Nicole Paquette Nicky has been at EPA for 15 years, 9 of which have been in OEI. She started in 1995 with the Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics as a toxicologist and moved to the Office of Pesticides Programs before coming to OEI as senior toxicologist. She currently is Chief of the Analytical Support Branch in OEI’s Environmental Analysis Division. Nicky received a B.S. in Medical Technology from the University of Vermont and Ph.D. in Pharmacology/Toxicology from the University of Maryland and conducted inhalation toxicological research at the Johns Hopkins University as a Postdoctoral Fellow before coming to EPA.

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Juan Parra Juan Parra is the TRI-MEweb project leader for the TRI program. Juan has 9 years of experience working as a hazardous waste regulation writer in the Office of Solid Waste before joining the TRI program in March 2008. Juan holds a Master of Science Degree in Civil Engineering from Syracuse University and a Bachelor of Science Degree in Natural Resource Engineering from the New York State University College of Environmental Science and Forestry.

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Lee Pera Lee Pera has a B.A. degree is Spanish/Portuguese from the University of Minnesota and graduate degrees in Geography and Public Administration from the University of Oregon. Before coming to the federal government, she worked for non-profits on sustainable development issues and in student affairs at a community college. Lee is a Program Analyst in the Environmental Analysis Division of OEI where she is working on the EPA Earth project, a geospatial tool for data discovery and analysis. She is also assisting in efforts to encourage the use of EPA’s environmental indicators by educators and communities.

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Janet Ranganathan Janet Ranganathan is the Vice President for Science and Research. She oversees and takes a lead role in the planning, quality control, and evaluation of WRI’s research and publications. She mentors research staff, manages effective peer review processes, and oversees mechanisms for project and program evaluation. Before becoming Vice President, Janet directed WRI’s People and Ecosystem Program to reverse ecosystem degradation and ensure their capacity to meet human needs. Within the People and Ecosystems Program she launched an initiative to Mainstreaming Ecosystem Services|>mainstream ecosystem services in public and private sector development decisions. Janet has also served in WRI’s Market and Enterprise and Climate and Energy Programs. She developed and directed WRI’s US Climate Policy Initiative which advanced policies and business actions that resulted in significant greenhouse gas emissions reductions. She founded and directed the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative, an international multi-stakeholder partnership convened by WRI and the World Business Council for Sustainable Development for the purpose of developing international greenhouse gas accounting and reporting standards. The Greenhouse Gas Protocol is now the international accounting and reporting standard for business and numerous national and state greenhouse gas programs. Janet has written extensively on a broad range of sustainable development challenges, including business and markets, environmental performance measurement, environmental accounting, climate change, ecosystem degradation, and global environmental governance. Prior to joining WRI Janet worked on business and environmental issues in the U.K. both as a Senior Lecturer at the University of Hertfordshire and in a regulatory capacity with the Department of Environment and Hertfordshire Waste Regulatory Authority. Janet Ranganathan received a BSc. (Hons) from Imperial College of Science, Technology & Medicine, London in 1983, and an MSc. with distinction in Environmental Technology from Imperial College in 1990.

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Chris Rascher Mr. Rascher is an Enforcement Engineer for the United States Environmental Protection Agency, in Boston, Massachusetts He is lead inspector for the TRI program and directs all technical aspects of TRI enforcement. He also inspects and enforces other aspects of EPCRA and Risk Management Program . He has been with the EPA for more than 20 years and has worked in a number of enforcement and voluntary programs. Prior to working with EPA he was a consultant for Industry. Chris holds a bachelors degree from the State University of New York, College of Environmental Science, and a Master’s Degree in Environmental Engineering from Syracuse University.

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Bill Reilly Bill Reilly has fifty year of governmental air pollution control, industrial hygiene, pollution prevention and waste management experience. Bill has been with US EPA’s Region 3 for twenty years and currently works as an environmental engineer in the TRI Program within the Land and Chemicals Management Division. Prior to the US EPA, Bill was an air pollution control and industrial hygiene engineer with the City of Philadelphia and later the Assistant Health Commissioner for the City’s Air Pollution Control Program. Bill started his career as an Engineering Officer in the US Marine Corps. Bill received a BS in Sanitary Engineering from Pennsylvania State University and a MS in Environmental Engineering from Drexel Institute of Technology.

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Larry Reisman Larry Reisman has a B.S. in marketing from Rutgers College, a J.D. degree from Rutgers Law School – Newark, and a Masters degree in Environmental Policy from Yale University. Mr. Reisman has worked for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) since 1998. Some of his duties in his position at the EPA’s Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) Program include rulemaking activities, crafting interpretive guidance responses for the regulated community, and supporting TRI data quality projects including comparisons of TRI data to other Agency data based on requirements of the Clean Air Act (CAA), the Clean Water Act (CWA) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

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Ingrid Rosencrantz Ingrid Rosencrantz is Chief of TRI’s Regulation Development Branch. She leads TRI’s regulatory development, data quality and policy analysis.

Prior to becoming Branch chief, Ms. Rosencrantz led the TRI Public Data Release and the TRI State Exchange. She was a senior staff member and Acting Branch Chief in the Office of Solid Waste and has experience developing policy under RCRA, CERCLA, and NEPA, as well as EPCRA.

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Edwin J. Rossman The University of North Texas granted Edwin J. Rossman his Ph. D. in 1990. He also holds a Masters and Bachelors Degrees from Texas Tech University. His dissertation topic was titled: "Individual Resources, Social Environment, and Flood Victimization". Ed has taught at number of universities and is currently an adjunct professor in Oklahoma State University’s Environmental Sciences Program. His 30 years of academic and water resource experience includes:

  • Adjunct Professor, Environmental Science, Oklahoma State University
  • Social Scientist: Tulsa District US Army Corps of Engineers
  • Adjunct Professor, University of Tulsa
  • Adjunct Instructor, Tulsa Community College
  • Teaching Fellow, University of North Texas
  • Research Associate, Texas Tech University of Medicine

Ed’s works are published in scholarly peer-reviewed journals including recent pieces in Society and Natural Resources, Human Ecology and Journal of Fishery Management. He is also a member of the American Sociological Association and the Southwestern Sociological Association, where he serves as Secretary/Treasurer.

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Laura Ruhl Laura Ruhl is currently a PhD student in the Earth and Ocean Sciences Division of the Nicholas School of the Environment at Duke University. Her dissertation is focused on the impact of coal combustion residues (CCRs) on the environment, as well as geochemical and isotopic characterization of CCRs as an artifact of their production and source coals. Laura has been doing investigatory field work at the Tennessee Valley Authority coal ash spill site since Jan 2009, and has published a paper on the spill (Environ. Sci. Technol. 2009, 43, 6326–6333). Laura received her BS and MS at the University of Florida in Geological Sciences. FOR MODERATOR INTRO: Laura Ruhl is currently a PhD student in the Earth and Ocean Sciences Division of the Nicholas School of the Environment at Duke University. Her dissertation is focused on the impact of coal combustion residues on the environment, as well as geochemical and isotopic characterization of coal combustion residues as an artifact of their production and source coals.

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Pamela Russell Pam Russell has been with OEI since 2000. She combines a technical background in Microbiology with experience in outreach and training the public on regulatory and scientific issues.

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Rachel Russell Rachel Nicole Russell is youth program manager for Literacy for Environmental Justice, in San Francisco’s Bayview Hunters Point. At LEJ, Rachel recruits and trains youth leaders to conduct community-based research and advocacy focused on including the youth voice in public policy and urban redevelopment projects. Rachel’s position at LEJ is shared with the community-based non-profit Arc Ecology, where she serves as community outreach coordinator for the Alternatives for Study, educating Bayview residents about the massive impact of the City’s proposed redevelopment of southeast San Francisco. A native of southeast San Francisco, Rachel is a graduate of UC Berkeley’s College of Natural Resources, where she majored in Conservation and Resource Studies; she is now pursuing a Master’s degree in Environmental Management at the University of San Francisco, where her focus is developing the capacity of disadvantaged communities to participate in environmental decision making.

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John Scalera John Scalera has been a chemist with the Environmental Protection Agency since 1987. His career with EPA started with the Quality Assurance Group for Region III stationed in Annapolis, Md. There he was primarily involved in the Superfund Contract Laboratory Program. In 1989 he moved to the Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics where he worked as a part of the National Program Chemicals Division. Here Mr. Scalera designed and implemented the National Lead Laboratory Accreditation Program. In 2000, he moved to the Environmental Analysis Division of the newly formed EPA Office of Environmental Information. The focus of Mr. Scalera’s activities in OEI have been in support of the TRI program and EPA’s Nanotechnology Program. His TRI program activities included the development of environmental fate assessments of chemicals relevant to the TRI program as well as oversight in the development of the TRI-Chemical Hazard Information Profiles System (TRI-CHIP).

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Margaret Schneider

Margaret Schneider is the Principal Deputy Assistant Administrator for EPA’s Office of Environmental Information (OEI). In this capacity, she provides critical leadership, guidance and oversight of OEI’s vital role in EPA’s mission, to provide high quality environmental information and analyses for use in EPA decision-making.

Ms. Schneider’s experience in EPA is as impressive as it is extensive, including previous work in OEI, and her recent assignment as the Director of the Office of Administration and Policy for the Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance (OECA). Here Margaret provided analysis and advice to the OECA Assistant Administrator on policy, budget, and management issues, including the formulation and execution of $563M budget supporting over 3000 FTE nationwide. Margaret served in leadership positions with EPA’s Office of Prevention, Pesticides and Toxic Substances and the Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response. She also served as the Associate Deputy Administrator of EPA and as the Counselor to EPA’s Deputy Administrator, where she provided strategic focus to the coordination of the Agency’s overall regulatory programs.

Ms. Schneider is a graduate of Barnard College of Columbia University. She holds a Masters Degree in Environmental Management from Yale University and a law degree from Georgetown University. She is a member of the District of Columbia Bar.

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Velu Senthil Velu Senthil has a Masters Degree in Chemical Engineering and PhD in Polymer Technology. He has been working in EPA’s TRI Program since 1998. Though Velu is currently focusing on TRI data quality efforts, he has worked on Release Estimation Techniques, industry-specific and process-specific guidance documents. Prior coming to EPA, Velu worked at US Department of Energy on alternatives to transportation fuels. Before that Velu had worked in industry and academic institutions.

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Dipti Singh, US EPA Dipti Singh is Chief of the Toxics Release Inventory Program, Information Outreach Branch within the Office of Information Analysis and Access. This branch is responsible for managing TRI data operations and for conducting outreach and strengthening partnerships with external stakeholders. Prior to TRI, Dipti worked with the Design for the Environment Program and managed several electronic industry projects. In the past life Before joining EPA, Dipti spent several years with Booz Allen and Hamilton. Dipti has an MBA from Robert. H. Smith School of Business at University of Maryland, and a Ph.D in Chemistry from Japalpur University, India.

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David G. Smith Mr. Smith has recently joined EPA to head up its’ Facility Registry System within the Office of Environmental Information. He has an extensive background in geospatial technologies and systems integration, and is also a licensed Professional Engineer and Land Surveyor, with over 20 years experience in a variety of projects dealing with mapping and environmental issues, as well as in environmental modeling, analysis and information management. Mr. Smith is supporting the TRI program through efforts toward improvement of data quality, particularly locational data, to support improved analysis of TRI reporters.

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Mark Stephan Mark Stephan received a Ph.D. in political science from Princeton University in the year 2000. After serving for two years as a visiting assistant professor at Georgetown University in Washington, DC, he joined the faculty at Washington State University Vancouver in the fall of 2001. He teaches courses in American politics, including classes in public policy, environmental policy administration, and democratic theory. Dr. Stephan received a dissertation grant from Resources for the Future, a Washington-based environmental think tank, in 1997-1998. During his five years in Washington, D.C., Dr. Stephan also worked for the Environmental Protection Agency twice, first in the Office of Emergency and Remedial Response (OERR) and second in the Office of Policy, Economics, and Innovation (OPEI). His research is in the areas of environmental information disclosure policy and citizen involvement in environmental decision-making. He has been published in the journals Social Science Quarterly and State and Local Government Review, among others. Working with Michael Kraft and Troy Abel, he has recently completed a book entitled Coming Clean: Information Disclosure and Environmental Performance.

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Andrew Stoeckle Andrew Stoeckle (Abt Associates Inc.) has supported the TRI program since 1992, participating in site visits, numerous analyses, cross-data industry sector and facility analyses for profiling operations, and identification of outliers. He has an expert understanding of the TRI program, data quality and end uses of TRI information, all of which are important to analytical projects involving EPA and non-EPA data sources. Mr. Stoeckle has also contributed to the design of web-based information tools and analyses, such the TRI comparative toolsand MyRTK mobile, which capitalize on integrating TRI with other data systems at the facility and chemical record levels.

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Ellen Szarleta-Yancy Dr. Szarleta-Yancy is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Public and Environmental Affairs with a background in natural resource economics and law. She teaches classes in environmental law and policy as well as in the area of economics. She currently is researching local environmental issues including sustainable development and public participation in environmental decision-making processes. She is actively involved in a number of local environmental organizations that work on issues related to the quality of life of Northwest Indiana residents. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin, and her J.D. from the University of Iowa. In 2002, Dr. Szarleta-Yancy was the principal investigator for the State of Indiana for the The Small Communities Outreach Project for Environmental Issues (SCOPe). The SCOPe was a project of the National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration. It was funded through Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. EPA’s Office of Policy, Economics, and Innovation.

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John Tang John Tang is an economist at the Center for Economic Studies in the U.S. Census Bureau as well as an adjunct professor of economics at the University of Maryland, College Park. He received his PhD in economics from the University of California, Berkeley. His research examines issues in international trade, environmental economics, growth and development, and economic history. Some current projects include analyzing the relationship between trade openness and toxic trade flows; international commodity pricing patterns; and industrialization in East Asia. In 2011, he will join the Research School of Economics at the Australian National University as an assistant professor in economics.

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Guy Tomassoni Guy Tomassoni has been with the EPA since 1992. Currently he serves as the Chief of the Analytical Products Branch in the Environmental Analysis Division (EAD) of the Office of Information, Analysis and Access (OIAA) within EPA’s Office of Environmental Information (OEI). Staff in Guy’s Branch work on a variety of efforts related to OIAA’s primary function of helping interested stakeholders find, understand and use quality environmental information, including for example: the TRI and Environmental Conditions in Communities Conference; tools for helping people find and analyze environmental data; environmental indicators; environmental justice; watershed collaboration; cross-agency collaboration on environmental health issues; and, access to environmental information on Tribal lands. Prior to joining OEI in 2008, Guy worked in EPA’s Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response (OSWER) serving as the Land Chapter Lead on EPA’s Report of the Environment, developing better performance measures for land cleanup and revitalization, co-authoring a variety of ground water protection and cleanup policies, and leading a national training effort on RCRA Corrective Action Results Based Project Management. Prior to joining EPA Guy was involved with hazardous site cleanups as an environmental consultant and as an employee of the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. Guy received his B.S. in Geology from University of Maryland and his M.S. in Engineering Geology (focus on hydrogeology) from Drexel University in Philadelphia.

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Danielle Vallée Danielle Vallée has been coordinating and managing projects related to environmental pollution since 1997. Her work has included research, feasibility studies and the development of projects involving technology transfers relative to managing domestic and hazardous substances in Latin America and the Caribbean. Since 2006, she has worked as coordinator for the North American Pollutant Release and Transfer Register (PRTR) Project at the Commission for Environmental Cooperation.

Ms. Vallée has a B.A. with a Specialization in Urban-Economic Geography; and a Masters of Public Policy and Administration (Specialization: Geography) from Concordia University in Montréal, Québec.

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Christina Wadlington Christina Wadlington is currently employed in EPA’s Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention (OCSPP) – Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (OPPT) – where she works on Lead program partnerships, policy and outreach. In addition to her work on the Lead-Free Kids website, Christina is also involved in the implementation of Web 2.0 technologies in the Lead Program.

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Dalroy Ward Dalroy Ward has a B.A. in Geography from SUNY Buffalo and a M.S. in Computer Systems Management from the University of Maryland, University College. He has worked for years focusing on meeting EPA’s mission across a number of EPA Program Offices. He has 28 years of experience in the field of Environmental IT, with experience developing environmental modelling systems, developing databases, and making information available to the public and EPA staff.

Dalroy Ward is currently employed by EPA as a Senior Technology Advisor in the Office of Information Analysis and Access (OIAA). In this position he is developing a target architecture to be used to guide future development efforts to ensure that OIAA’s investments build on top of each other to create maximum value for the Agency. He is working on a number of projects including open government and making Web 2.0 tools available to the Agency. Previously, he was the Branch Chief of the Information Services Branch supporting efforts such as Envirofacts, myEnvironment, NEPAssist, and the usage of Web 2.0 tools and mobile applications.

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Richard "Chet" Wayland Richard A. "Chet" Wayland has over 24 years of experience in information management, air quality modeling and data analysis. He has been employed with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) since 1991 and currently serves as the Director for the Air Quality Assessment Division within the EPA’s Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards (OAQPS) in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. He is responsible for the overall management of air quality modeling, monitoring and data analysis programs for OAQPS. He has B.A. and M.S. degrees in Environmental Sciences from the University of Virginia.

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Mike Wells Mike Wells is the Assistant Director of the Environmental Health Program at Fresno Metro Ministry, a faith-based organization that works to create a more respectful, compassionate and inclusive community that promotes social, economic and environmental justice.

Mike has a degree in Intercultural Studies, and spent 9 years doing church and community work in Caracas, Venezuela. Since 2002, he has been living and working in Fresno, California, in the heart of the San Joaquin Valley.

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Steve Witkin Mr. Steve Witkin is the project officer for the TRI Explorer application out of the Environmental Analysis Branch (ASB) within the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) Office of Environmental Information (OEI). Since the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) data touches multiple disciplines, ASB includes staff with expertise in toxicology, public health, chemistry, statistics, and data analysis. Mr. Witkin has been with the EPA for 14 years. Prior to his federal government career, he had a short stint with the Maryland state government and spent more than 15 years in private industry as a mechanical engineer. His involvement with the TRJ program began in 1987 as part of the regulated community. Mr. Wilkin believes in a natural balance between a product, a product’s environment and the user. A specialized activity of Mr. Witkin includes learning |what| TRI data is requested by observing TRI Explorer maintenance files.

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Marie Zanowick Marie Zanowick is an enthusiastic and optimistic environmental engineer with 25 years of experience working for government environmental agencies. She started at the U.S Environmental Protection Agency Region 8 office in 1987, working on Superfund clean-up (1987 – 1990), Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) in hazardous waste minimization (1990-1995), the Pollution Prevention Program (1995-2000) and currently works to incorporate sustainability into public land management agencies in the West (2000- present). She has served as the EPA representative to develop environmental regulatory and pollution prevention programs in 9 developing countries for EPA Office of International Affairs (1990 – 2005). As a graduate of the Biomimicry 2010 Certificate Program, she combines her educational background in both Biology and Engineering, regulatory experience and facilitation skills to produce innovative solutions to a wide range of challenges.

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